FAQ

What is a Licensed Psychologist?

A Licensed Psychologist is mental health practitioner who has completed a Doctorate (Ph.D.) in psychology, which is the highest level of training in this field.

Psychologists do not prescribe medication in the state of Texas. However, as psychologists see their clients for longer and more frequent appointments than physicians, psychologists frequently collaborate with psychiatrists and other physicians who prescribe medications in order to provide the best care for their clients.

How can therapy help me? I can usually handle my problems on my own.

Mental health is part of your general health and overall wellness. People who engage in therapy are not abnormal; they are often “healthy,” high-functioning people who desire to make positive changes or are seeking fulfillment in their lives. Everyone searches for balance in their day-to-day lives and a psychologist can help guide clients towards that greater well-being.

Therapy can be helpful for many different situations and struggles. It can be used to reduce worry and anxiety, improve mood, cope with stress at work or home, and improve relationships with others. Therapy can be useful in making behavioral or emotional changes to larger, more chronic issues, or if you’re not quite ready to make a change, it is a place to look at problems, clarify goals, and generate motivation to change.

For many, a major life change or personal crisis causes a person to seek therapy. Although these events can be overwhelming and distressing, it can also be a good time to take the leap to seek professional help. Beginning therapy can be an important part of self-care, recovery, and personal growth.

What is therapy like?

Therapy is usually once a week, for 45-minute sessions. It can last for weeks, months, or longer. There is no obligation to commit to any specific number of sessions. Stopping therapy is often a mutual decision between the client and the psychologist. As my clients begin to make changes in their lives, many decide to taper off the frequency of their sessions and may only come in monthly or when something stressful pops up in their lives.

Therapy can be a lot of things: it can be a way of addressing a specific problem or event, or dealing with longer-term issues that may be disrupting your life. More than that, it is an investment in your personal growth and well-being.

I generally like to clarify goals for treatment in order to ensure that we are on the same page about the direction of treatment and so we can see how issues may change and evolve through treatment. Therapy can provide support and perspective, help you identify problem-solving strategies or coping skills that fit your life, and offer real strategies for making positive change. Emotional and behavioral change is different for every person and progress may be swift or it may be halting.

A big part of therapy is the therapeutic relationship between the psychologist and the client. In my practice, I strive to create a warm, accepting, and collaborative environment for my clients.